Louisiana Tech University Logo

College of Engineering & Science - Louisiana Tech University


Biomedical Engineering

Faculty Research

Headshot of Dr. Mary Caldorera-MooreMary Caldorera-Moore, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Therapeutic Micro- and Nanotechnology Biomaterial Laboratory, Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 207

Dr. Caldorera-Moore’s lab focuses on development of innovative approaches to long-term drug release and targeted, cell-specific drug delivery. Our research combines microscale and nanoscale technologies with intelligent biomaterials to create new and improved ways to deliver therapeutic agents to target sites in the body. Research in the lab focuses on the design, fabrication, characterization, and use of advanced micro/nano biosystems for targeted delivery.

Headshot of Dr. Mark DeCosterMark DeCoster, Ph.D., Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Associate Director, CBERS, The Cellular Neuroscience Lab, Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 235

Dr. DeCoster's laboratory is designed for biochemical and digital imaging analysis of cellular events in the brain. Current planned activities include brain cell inflammatory responses, digital imaging of apoptosis in normal and brain tumor cells and response of brain glial cells to injury. Major equipment includes PC- and Mac-based imaging workstations (4); motorized inverted fluorescence microscope with digital camera (Leica).

Headshot of Dr. Bryant Hollins

Bryant Hollins, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering, The Oxidative Stress Research Lab, Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 222B

The oxidative stress research lab studies proteins that are prone to oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases. One of the things we seek to determine is the interplay between these proteins and other biomacromolecules. The ultimate goal is to discover new protein therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease.

Headshot of Dr. Leon IasemidisLeon Iasemidis, Ph.D., Director of CBERS, Professor and Rhodes Eminent Chair of Biomedical Engineering, The Brain Dynamics Laboratory, Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 305; The EEG Laboratory, Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 107

The EEG Laboratory
A facility for recording and long-term monitoring of spontaneous (awake, asleep) or evoked electroencephalographic (EEG) activity from the surface or interior of the human and animal brain. The Lab is equipped with three computerized EEG recording systems and has the capability to record from up to 128 electrode sites.

The Brain Dynamics Laboratory
A teaching and research computational facility with multiple computer stations, large (Terabyte) associated data storage units, fast access to supercomputing networks, professional software for data analysis. We develop novel in-house algorithms to investigate the spatio-temporal dynamics of electrical (EEG) and magnetic (MEG) signals from the brain of patients and animals, and computer simulation models, on the way into and out of crises. Epilepsy and progressive brain post-traumatic illnesses are among the dynamical disorders we concentrate upon. Conventional signal processing, image processing and data mining techniques, as well as innovative measures of stability, complexity and information flow in networks of nonlinear systems are utilized for long-term prediction of epileptic seizures. Adaptive feedback control has been implemented for their efficient and effective real-time control via neuromodulation. The research at the Brain Dynamics Lab also assists with the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and evaluation of the treatment of those and other brain dynamical disorders.

Over the years, our research has been supported by federal and state funding agencies (NIH, NSF, DoD, VA, DARPA, the Science Foundation of Arizona), private foundations (American Epilepsy Research Foundation, the Whitaker Foundation) and other organizations (Cyberonics Inc.).

Headshot of Dr. Steven JonesSteven Jones, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, The Biofluid Mechanics Laboratory Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 233

Dr. Jones' research interests stem from biomedical applications of fluid dynamics. Applications include the improvement of Doppler ultrasound instruments for velocity measurement, modeling of pressure-flow relationships in the vascular access grafts used for dialysis, and modeling of the effects of transport and flow on the positive feedback and negative feedback control mechanisms for platelet activation and adhesion. The laboratory includes laser Doppler velocimetry equipment, a cone-in plate viscometer, a data acquisition computer, various PC computers, ultrasonic equipment, an anti-vibration table, a spectrum analyzer, physiological pressure transducers, Carolina Medical electromagnetic flow meters, a transit time flow meter, model manufacturing facilities, a single syringe infusion pump and a 10-syringe infusion pump.

Headshot of Dr. Teresa MurrayTeresa A. Murray, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, The Integrated Neuroscience Imaging Laboratory, Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 132

Dr. Murray’s research goals are to expand the reach and functionality of micro-optics for neuroscience applications and to create living bio-optical systems using molecular and cellular engineering. She plans to incorporate electrodes for field potential recording into implantable micro-optic devices and perform time-course experiments. Her main aim is to connect receptor dynamics, neural circuit function and behavior through in vivo fluorescence imaging, neural recording and behavioral experiments. This concerted approach will streamline experiments, enable unparalleled comparative analysis and elucidate connections not possible using multiple, discrete experiments. Additionally, this system will facilitate studies of neural dynamics and behavior in drug addiction, neurodegeneration, and stem cell therapy. While her focus has been on neuroscience, the tools and techniques she has developed have broad applications for life sciences and translational research.

Headshot of Dr. Stan NapperStanley A. Napper, Ph.D., Vice President Emeritus of Research and Development, Professor Emeritus of Biomedical Engineering

Dr. Napper participates at various levels in Engineering Education research. Earlier research activities have included Biomedical Engineering applications of artificial intelligence and mathematical modeling of physiological systems.

 

Headshot of Dr. Randal NullRandal E. Null, Ph.D., Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Location: Institute for Micromanufacturing 203

Dr. Null provides leadership to Louisiana Tech University and the State of Louisiana by providing national quality higher education in research and development areas that improve energy systems, cyberspace security, medical technology, fundamental nanotechnology processes, biological/chemical/physical sensors and other cutting-edge science and technology.

Headshot of Dr. Patrick O'NealD. Patrick O'Neal, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering, The Nano Particle Training and Manufacturing Laboratory, Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 136

Dr. O'Neal's laboratory focuses on biomedical optics and nanotechnology for the support of cancer detection, treatment, and management. Current activities include optical sensing and imaging, development of optically-active nanoparticles for detection, imaging, and drug delivery, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for bio-assays, and nanomaterial toxicity assessment. Major equipment includes a PTI Dual Monochromator Fluorescence Spectrometer, fiber optic equipment (Thor Labs), a Beckman Coulter DU-800 UV-Vis Spectrophotometer, and a Raman Systems R3000-HR Raman Spectrometer: portable system with 785nm laser.

Core Research Support Laboratories

The Animal Care Facility
Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 129 through 148

The Animal Care Facility is a controlled-access facility located in the Biomedical Engineering building. These laboratories (Biomedical Engineering Building 129 through 148) occupy a total of 4,430 sq. ft., and the director's office and animal-related research laboratories occupy 1,700 sq. ft. A surgical suite, a cage washing area/autoclave room, storage, a necropsy laboratory, and nine individual animal housing rooms with ventilated cage racks that have individual electronic access control occupy 2,730 sq. ft. of space. The animals are monitored on a daily basis by the director or his designated employee. The university has a veterinarian on staff who is a member of the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC). He and the director provide training to research animal users. The University has an arrangement with the Licensed Laboratory Animal Veterinarian at Louisiana State University Medical Center in Shreveport for specialized assistance, when needed.

The Histological Techniques Laboratory (Animal Care Facility)
Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 134

This laboratory contains equipment for the preparation of specimens for light microscopy including paraffin ovens, an embedding station, a paraffin microtome, a vibratome, and staining equipment and supplies. The laboratory also contains equipment for the preparation of specimens for transmission electron microscopy, including an epoxy embedding area, epoxy oven, ultra microtome, and grid staining equipment and supplies. The room is equipped with a surgical table for collection of specimens and a chemical hood for safe use of toxic chemicals.

The Neuro Physiology Laboratory (Animal Care Facility)
Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 132

This laboratory houses a 1' x 7' Faraday cage for electromagnetic isolation, an inverted microscope and amplification equipment.

The Imaging and Nanopatterning Laboratory
Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 239

This laboratory contains a Bioforce Nanoscience Nano-Enabler for patterning biological substances with nanoscale precision onto substrates. The room also contains an Olympus MTV-3 stereo microscope with a Leica DFC500 camera, three Dell Precision imaging workstations, and a Suss MicroTeck micropositioning station.

The Tissue Engineering and Cell Culture Laboratory
Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 220B and 240
This laboratory has been designed to investigate the effects of hemodynamic phenomena on the behavior of vascular cells, (endothelial cells, platelets, smooth muscle cells, osteoblasts) as related to atherosclerosis, intimal hyperplasia, thrombosis, bone growth, and micromanufactured cell substrates. The laboratory includes a laminar fume hood, an environmentally-controlled flow chamber, an imaging microscope, an injection-flow apparatus (syringe pump), an incubator, a centrifuge, a refrigerator, and a plate reader. The laboratory is jointly funded by The Center for Biomedical Engineering and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS) and the School of Biological Sciences.

The Biomedical Engineering Common Laboratory
Location: Biomedical Engineering Building 221

This laboratory houses a set of shared equipment that is available to all of the faculty and students performing research in the Biomedical Engineering Center. Major pieces of equipment in this laboratory are a PC digital image analysis workstation, two refrigerator-freezers (to '20 ˚C), a chemical hood, a lyophilizer, a streaming potential instrument, a tensile strength instrument, a liquid scintillation counter, a centrifuge, a microbalance-scale, a pH meter, sn AKTA Prime Protein Purification System, an Advanced Chemtech Apex 396 protein synthesizer, and an upright microscope.


OmniUpdate